MWA-Northwest is thrilled to present five distinguished speakers, serving both local and distant tribal nations, to discuss the impact of jurisdictional issues between the tribes and local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies.  Sign up on EVENTBRITE for this one-of-a-kind event.

Suquamish Tribal Police Chief Mike Lasnier has over 35 years of law enforcement service and experience. Upon completion of his Marine enlistment as Scout/Sniper, he started his policing career with South King County. He served in Washington State’s highest crime zone (murder, arson, forcible rape, etc.) as a patrol officer, field training officer, and narcotics detective. Additionally, he was a member of the regional SWAT team and the Federal Narcotics task force.

In 1997, he began his long, distinguished career in tribal law enforcement. He’s served as the Chief of Police with the Lower Elwha Tribe and became the Chief of Police for the Suquamish Tribe in 2004. He has worked tirelessly on Tribal issues to ensure the safety of Native Americans on their own land and coastal fishing waters.

His experience has made him a sought-out expert on tribal law enforcement matters state and nationwide. He’s served two terms as President of the Northwest Association of Tribal Enforcement Officers, sits on its executive board, and has leadership roles on multiple Statewide projects and committees.

Suquamish Tribal Deputy Police Chief Mark L. Williams hails from Hyannis Port, Massachusetts. A veteran of the U.S. Army and U.S. Coast Guard, he began volunteering with the Suquamish Police in 1999, ultimately logging in more than 7,500 hours. After attending the Police Academy in 2010, he started working full time for the tribe. He advanced to Patrol Sergeant in 2013, Detective Sergeant in 2015, and was promoted Deputy Chief in 2021. Included in his various duties are police diver, drug recognition expert, field training officer, standardized field sobriety test instructor, and drone pilot.

Recognized for his commitment to community policing, etc. he sits on several tribal, county, and state collaborations focused on helping criminals reentering society upon release from jail or prison in an effort to reduce recidivism. Additionally, he is the sole representative for all U.S. tribes on the Department of Justice Uniform Crime Reporting modernization project.

 

MIKE MCBRIDE has served as attorney general for the Seminole Nation, as justice of the Pawnee Nation Supreme Court as attorney general to the Sac and Fox Nation. He has represented more than 20 Indian tribal governments or their entities, numerous corporations and individuals doing business with tribes.

 

 

TROY EID currently serves as the elected President of the Navajo Nation Bar Association. He has also served as Colorado’s 40th United States Attorney and as chair of the Indian Law and Order Commission (the national advisory board to the President and Congress for strengthening public safety for all 573 federally recognized tribes in the United States). He has also received honors for excellence by the FBI, the U.S. Secret Service, and more than two dozen federal, state and tribal departments and agencies across the country.

 

 

DANIEL RAAS is a semi-retired lawyer who spent 39 years representing the Lummi Nation in Whatcom County. He worked 3 years for and with the Quinault Indian Nation in Grays Harbor County. He has served as an Associate Justice and later Chief Justice on the Tulalip Court of Appeals. Although not a member of any Tribe, nor having a heritage grounded in Indian culture, he has a unique perspective about inter-cultural relationships and interactions.